The Ultimate Egg Guide! Plus, How To Naturally Dye Eggs For Easter.

With Easter just around the corner, I visited the Queen Victoria Market to get some egg-cellent tips for buying and storing eggs! I also thought I’d share with you a simple DIY for creating beautiful, naturally dyed eggs. It’s a breeze to do and an Easter activity that will keep your kids entertained over the school holidays.

Happy Easter!

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What’s the Difference Between Brown Eggs and White Eggs?

It sounds so simple, but the colour of the egg depends on the chicken that laid it. White feathered chickens with white ear lobes lay white eggs while red-feathered ones with red ear lobes lay brown eggs. Nutritionally though, there is no difference between white and brown eggs.

What’s the best type of egg to buy?

Cage Free? Free range? Deciding which type of egg to buy can be confusing. But free range pastured eggs are generally considered the best – for the chickens, environment and you.

As free range pastured eggs must be raised at under 15,000 chooks per hectare, and on green pasture, they are considered a more humane and better quality egg. True free-range eggs are also far more nutritious than commercially raised eggs due to their natural diet of seeds, green plants, insects and worms.

To see the difference for yourself, stop by The Chicken Pantry in the Dairy Hall and pick up some Milawa Eggs that are organic, free-range and pastured.

How Can You Tell if an Egg is Fresh?

It can sometimes be hard to tell if your eggs have gone bad just by looking at them. But Luke from The Eggporium (Stall 43-38, I Shed) says all you have to do is fill a bowl with cold water and drop the egg in. If it sinks to the bottom, it’s fresh. If it floats, toss it as it’s passed its prime.

What’s The Best Way To Store Eggs?

You can keep your eggs in the fridge or your pantry. The trick is consistency as eggs are porous and will expand or contract in different conditions.

 

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How To Naturally Dye Easter Eggs

Little ones will love discovering how they can create natural dyes with just a few common ingredients you’re probably already picking up at the market.

To dye your eggs blue…
• Place 4 cups of chopped red cabbage and 4 cups of water in a pot and bring to a boil. Lower heat and let simmer for 30 minutes.
• Strain dye into a bowl, mix in two tablespoons of white vinegar and let cool to room temperature.
• For pale blue, soak hardboiled eggs in dye for a few hours.
• For royal blue, soak hardboiled eggs overnight.
• Remove eggs with spoon and let dry on wire rack.

To dye your eggs yellow…
• Place 3 tablespoons of turmeric and 4 cups of water in a pot and bring to a boil. Lower heat and let simmer for 30 minutes.
• Strain dye into a bowl, mix in two tablespoons of white vinegar and let cool to room temperature.
• For pale yellow, soak hardboiled eggs in dye for a few hours.
• For deep gold, boil raw eggs in dye for 30 minutes.
• Remove eggs with spoon and let dry on wire rack.

To dye your eggs brown…
• Mix two tablespoons of white vinegar into strongly brewed coffee and let cool to room temperature.
• For dark, rich brown, boil raw eggs for 30 minutes in dye.
• For light brown, soak hardboiled eggs in dye for a few hours.
• Remove eggs with spoon and let dry on wire rack.

To dye your eggs orange…
• Place 4 cups of red onionskins and 4 cups of water in a pot and bring to a boil. Lower heat and let simmer for 30 minutes.
• Strain dye into a bowl, mix in two tablespoons of white vinegar and let cool to room temperature.
• For sienna, boil raw eggs in dye for 30 minutes.
• For orange, soak hardboiled eggs in dye for a few hours.
• Remove eggs with spoon and let dry on wire rack.

$10 Golden Egg Promotion
If you’re visiting the Queen Victoria Market over the next week, make sure you check out the $10 special offers that your favourite traders have organized just for Easter.

Clare Hillier is Editor and Creator of the award-winning life and style blog, Checks and Spots // Photography by Fiona Storey

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